Mahakaleshwar Jyotirlinga | The Divine Home of Lord Shiva

Mahakaleshwar Temple, Ujjain

The Mahakaleshwar Jyotirlinga, one of India’s 12 Jyotirlingas, is located in the historic city of Ujjain in the state of Madhya Pradesh. The Mahakaal lingam at this temple, dedicated to Lord Shiva, is believed to be self-manifest, drawing currents of Shakti (strength) from within itself. A towering spire (shikhara) with complex and magnificent carvings adorns the structure. The Omkareshwara linga is located on the second floor, above the Mahakaleshwar lingam. A figure of Nagchandreshwar, with Lord Shiva and Parvati seated on a ten-hooded snake, is enshrined on the third floor.

It is a self-created linga and does not require mantra shakti for power (statues). Dakshinamukhi is the only linga that faces south, because death is said to occur in a southerly direction.

Jyotirlinga – The Gift of Shiva

 

Jyotirlingas are Lord Shiva’s sacred shrines; it is said that Lord Shiva himself visited these sites, hence they hold a special place in the hearts of followers. In India, there are 12 of them.

 

Jyotirlinga is Sanskrit for ‘light column or pillar.’ The ‘Stambha’ sign denotes the absence of beginning and end.

 

Lord Shiva appeared as a column of light and instructed each of them to find the ends of the argument between Lord Brahma and Lord Vishnu over who was the ultimate god. Neither of them was capable of completing the task.

 

The jyotirlingas are said to be found in the areas where these columns of light fell.

 

Mahakaleshwar Jyotirlinga

 

The Mahakaleshwar Jyotirlinga, one of India’s 12 jyotirlingas, is thought to be swayambhu, or self-created. Mahakal, or Lord Shiva, is known as the Lord of Time and Death since Kaal signifies ‘time’ and ‘death.’

 

The Mahakaleshwar Temple, which is located in the historic city of Ujjain in the state of Madhya Pradesh, is one of India’s 12 Jyotirlingas.

Mahakaleshwar Jyotirlinga

The Mahakal lingam at this temple, dedicated to Lord Shiva, is believed to be Swayambhu (self-manifest), drawing currents of Shakti (strength) from within itself. Mahakaleshwar is also one of India’s 18 Maha Shakti Peethas.

 

Another element that contributes to Mahakaleshwar being one of India’s most renowned Jyotirlingas is that the Mahakaleshwar idol is Dakshina Mukhi, facing south, unlike all other Jyotirlingas.

 

The Bhasma-Aarti of Mahakaleshwar Temple is considered a Hindu pilgrimage and is extremely popular among devotees.

 

The Mahakaleshwar Temple complex is a wide courtyard with sculptural finery and elegance influenced by Maratha, Bhumija, and Chalukya structural design traditions, complete with stunning Mahakaleshwar lingam statues.

 

It also features Omkaresvara and Nagachandresvara inscriptions, as well as images of Ganesha, Kartikeya, and Parvati. During the Maha Shivaratri celebration, the temple, which is extended across five levels, attracts a large crowd of believers.

 

What is the location of the Mahakaleshwar Jyotirlinga?

 

The temple is located in Ujjain, Madhya Pradesh, India, near the historical city of Ujjain. It is located on the banks of the Shipra River, which is considered sacred.

 

Mahakaleshwar Temple’s Unique Features

 

The architectural styles of the Mahakaleshwar temple are Maratha, Bhumija, and Chalukya. It is divided into five levels, one of which is below ground. Goddess Parvati (to the north), Lord Shiva’s sons Ganesha (to the west) and Kartikeya (to the east), and Lord Shiva’s mount, Nandi, are all shown (to the south).

Mahakaleshwar Jyotilinga Temple

The Omkareshwara linga is located on the second floor, above the Mahakaleshwar lingam. A figure of Nagchandreshwar, with Lord Shiva and Parvati seated on a ten-hooded snake and surrounded by other statues, is enshrined on the third floor of the temple.

 

A towering spire (shikhara) with complex and magnificent carvings adorns the structure.

 

Mahakaleshwar Jyotirlinga’s history

 

The fact that this temple is mentioned in the Puranas and that Prajapita Brahma erected it is indicative of its ancient existence. Kumarasena, the son of Chandpradyot, a previous monarch of Ujjain, is thought to have built the temple in the 6th century AD.

 

Under the reigns of King Udayaditya and King Naravarman in the 12th century AD, it was further rebuilt. In the 18th century AD, the Maratha general Ranoji Shinde, under Peshwa Bajirao-I, rebuilt the temple.

 

What is Mahakaleshwar Jyotirlinga’s significance?

 

The legend surrounding Mahakaleshwar Jyotirlinga has various variations, just like many historic structures and the stories that accompany them. This is how one of them goes.

 

King Chandrasena of Ujjain is said to have been a devoted devotee of Lord Shiva. Shrikhar, a small boy, wanted to pray alongside him as he was praying. He was not permitted to do so, and he was exiled to the city’s outskirts.

 

He overheard enemy monarchs Ripudamana and Singhaditya plotting to attack Ujjain with the help of a demon named Dushanan.

Mahakaleshwar Temple

He proceeded to pray to Lord Shiva for the city’s protection. A priest, Vridhi, heard his pleas and pleaded to the Lord to save the city as well. Meanwhile, Ujjain was assaulted by competing kingdoms.

 

When Lord Shiva appeared in his Mahakal form and saved them, they were on the verge of taking the city. Lord Shiva has been worshipped as a linga in this famed Ujjain temple since that day, at the request of his worshippers.

 

Mahakaleshwar Jyotirlinga – Some interesting facts.

 

It has its own strength because it is a self-created linga. Like the other lingas and moorthies, it does not require mantra shakti for power (statues).

 

Dakshinamukhi is the only jyotirlinga that faces south. The other jyotirlingas are all facing east. This is because death is said to occur in a southerly direction. Lord Shiva’s face to the south denotes his mastery over death. In truth, people worship Mahakaleshwar in order to avoid dying prematurely – to live a long life.

 

Only one day a year, on Nag Panchami, is Nagchadreshwar open to the public. On all other days, it remains closed.

 

Bhasma aarti (ashes offering) is a popular ceremony here. The Lord, like ash, is pure, non-dual, imperishable, and unchangeable.

 

While worshippers attend this temple throughout the year, the winter months, from October to March, are the greatest. It would be the ultimate delight for any devotee to visit it during Mahashivratri!

 

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