Tale of Triveni Sangam, Prayagraj

Triveni Sangam at Prayagraj

All rivers have their confluences, including the Ganga, Yamuna, Saraswati, Kaveri, Godavari, Krishna, Sindhu, Kshipra, and Brahmaputra. Shiva, Vishnu, and Brahma are Hindu gods, and Parvati, Lakshmi, and Saraswati are Hindu goddesses. As a result, Triveni is becoming increasingly important around the world. Triveni refers to the confluence of three rivers. The confluence of three rivers. In the Ganges river, near Prayag, there is a point where three rivers come together.

Ganga at Prayagraj
Ganga at Prayagraj

The confluence of the Ganga, Yamuna, and Saraswati is the same spot where Sangam and Triveni meet. This once-in-a-lifetime occurrence is well-known around the world. Saraswati, after Ganga and Yamuna, has grown with great importance in Indian culture. However, because the Ganga and Yamuna are readily visible but the Saraswati is not, how did the Triveni Sangam come to be?

 

There is, in fact, a tale behind it. Shrimad Bhagwat Purana tells the storey in great detail. In the past, Saraswati flowed through the Golden Land. Swarnabhoomi was renamed Swarna Rashtra later on. Over time, it evolved into Saurashtra. However, in ancient times, Saurashtra also included the entire state of Marwar. Saraswati used to bring a lot of compassion to this place. He was worshipped regularly. As the people of this region became more familiar with the Yavanas and began to trust in their ethics, Saraswati departed Marwar and Saurashtra after obtaining permission from Brahmaji and began residing in Prayag. The land was changed into a desert, which became known as Rajasthan today.

Triveni Sangam at Prayagraj
Triveni Sangam at Prayagraj

Saraswati is known as Annavati and Udakavati in the Rigveda. Saraswati is known by numerous names in the Mahabharata, including Plakshavati River, Vedasmriti, and Vedavati. The river Saraswati is mentioned as flowing east of the Yamuna and west of the Sutlej in the Rigveda. The Saraswati river is described as dry in the desert by the Tandaya and Jaiminiya brahmins.

 

The extinction of the Saraswati river is described in the Mahabharata at a region called ‘Vinashak’ in the desert. Brahmavarta, Kurukshetra, once stood on the banks of this river, but currently, it is a reservoir. Saraswati is also mentioned in the Mahabharata, where it is said that Balarama travelled from Dwarka to Mathura by river Saraswati and that after the fight, the Yadavas’ mortal bones were thrown into it, implying that travels might be conducted from this river.

 

Another river, Drishadvati, is also mentioned in the Vedic period. It was a Saraswati River tributary. It ran through Haryana as well. The path of the rivers shifted later when strong earthquakes occurred and the mountains of Haryana and Rajasthan rose from beneath the soil.

 

The direction of Drishadvati’s flow shifted in another place where Saraswati vanished. Today, this Drishadvati is known as the Yamuna. Its origins are said to date back 4,000 years. When the ground raised due to the earthquake, half of Saraswati’s water poured into the Yamuna (Drishadvati), and Saraswati’s water began to flow alongside the Yamuna. Prayag was chosen because of the convergence of the three rivers.

Convergence of three rivers at Prayagraj
Convergence of three rivers at Prayagraj

Saraswati is the name of seven rivers mentioned in the Mahabharata (Salya Parva). The Ganges was joined by the Saraswati river, which flowed alongside the Yamuna. According to Brajmandal folklore, a Saraswati river used to flow into Braj from the ancient state of Haryana, through the Ambika forest near Mathura, and into the Yamuna river at the ‘Saraswati Sangam Ghat’ near Gokarneshwar Mahadev. The Puranas mention the Saraswati river and its surrounding Ambika forest.

 

Even the Saraswati river’s old stream no longer flows regularly. In its place, a rainy stream known as the ‘Saraswati’ runs into the Mahavidya forest, where the present-day Ambika forest is located and meets the Yamuna. Saraswati Kund is another option. The existence of the stream of that ancient river can be seen in the Nala temple, Kund, and Ghat. As a result, the Braj tradition is linked to the primordial period of Swayambhuva Manu. Swami Ghat in Mathura was once known as Syamana Ghat.

 

Share on facebook
Facebook
Share on google
Google+
Share on twitter
Twitter
Share on linkedin
LinkedIn
Share on pinterest
Pinterest

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Share on facebook
Share on twitter
Share on linkedin
Share on whatsapp

Popular Posts:

Categories